Conference Schedule

This schedule is subject to change and will be updated as soon as the change is known. Click on the toggle buttons (+ and -) to view speaker bios and session descriptions.

Day 1 – Wednesday, May 1, 2024

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7:30am – 8:30am

Conference Lobby

Registration and Nutrition Bar opens

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8:30am – 8:45am

Alexander Ballroom

Welcome & Conference Kick-off

Presented By: Kelly Ihejiawu, HEAL President, Children's Medical Center, Dallas, TX

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8:45am – 10:00am

Alexander Ballroom

Keynote Address: Laying the Foundation for Well-Being through Self-Awareness and Meaningful Self-Care

Presented By: Kristy Eaton, EdD, MSW, LCSW, Assistant Director of the Indiana School Mental Health Initiative, Indiana Institute on Disability and Community at Indiana University

Dr. Kristy Eaton is the Assistant Director of the Indiana School Mental Health Initiative (ISMHI), a project of the Institute on Disability and Community at Indiana University-Bloomington (IU-B), a Continuity Lead for the Irsay Institute for Sociomedical Research at IU-B, and a voting member of the IU Faculty Council and the IU-B faculty council.  Dr. Eaton trains, consults, and collaborates with K-12 school districts across Indiana to develop an integrated framework of tiered social emotional and mental health services and supports to create the conditions for learning for all children.

Dr. Eaton holds a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology degree, a Master of Science in Social Work degree, and a Doctor of Education degree.  She is a proud IU grad.  Dr. Eaton is a past Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar Fellow as well as a licensed clinical social worker, Question Persuade Refer (QPR) Suicide Prevention Trainer, and an Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Interface Master Trainer.  Her ACEs training was conducted by Dr. Robert Anda, co-investigator of the original ACEs study.

Dr. Eaton has over 28 years of experience working in the field of mental health and education.  She has worked as an outpatient therapist, school-based therapist, school social worker, school district administrator, and university faculty member.  She is passionate about mental health for all, including the elimination of mental health stigma through education and training.  Other practice specialties include youth suicide prevention in schools; collaborating effectively with school-based mental health providers; and educator mindset, regulation, and wellness.  She has provided training and professional development at the local, state, regional, and national levels. Contact Dr. Eaton at kbeaton@iu.edu

Session Description:

Self-care is so much more than taking a bath, going for a walk, or getting your nails done.  Dr. Kristy says that’s just general maintenance!  Bring a beverage, relax, and join her for some discussion and experiences designed to really get you thinking about all six dimensions of self-care, what self-care and self-awareness really mean, and how to create a life that is gratifying throughout the work week and not just on the weekends!

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10:00am – 10:15am

Break

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10:15am – 11:15am

Breakout Sessions

Alexander Ballroom

Lecture

Using Tiered Intervention to Stretch Resources and Meet the Psychosocial Standards of Care for Children with Cancer

Presented By: Kathryn Kirkpatrick, PhD, LISW-S, Nationwide Children's Hospital

Kathryn Kirkpatrick has been the coordinator of the school liaison program in the Division of Hematology/Oncology/BMT at Nationwide Children’s Hospital for the past 18 years. Her program has expanded over the years, from serving only patients with brain tumors, to include services for all sections of the division. Kathryn was a founding member and board member of APHOES and an active participant in AECMN prior to the merge into HEAL. She holds a PhD in Educational Psychology, and has a strong interest in school belonging and connectedness, particularly for our students with chronic medical conditions.

Session Description:
The presentation shares how a model of universal school needs assessment and risk based, tiered intervention allowed for the most appropriate level of services at the right time for each patient and family. The model was able to meet the Psychosocial Standard of Care for school services. Level of risk was related to the amount of time needed to serve each family. Families and medical providers reported satisfaction with the model of service.

Renaissance Place

Lecture

Support Through the Storm: Where School Program and Child Life Meet

Presented By: Laura Keefe, BS, CCLS and Heather Wiselogle, MEd, Peyton Manning Children's Hospital

Laura Keefe has been a Certified Child Life Specialist at Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital (PMCH) for 6.5 years, specifically in the units of pediatric surgery and hematology/oncology. Laura graduated from Ball State University with a Bachelor of Science in Child Development and Child Life and also has extensive preschool experience in a classroom setting. Laura currently serves as the primary child life specialist for hematology and oncology patients and families, inpatient and outpatient, while also covering a pediatric acute care floor that cares for pre- and post-operative patients, behavioral health patients, and sickle cell patients. Since 2020, Laura has encountered and supported more than 100 patients and families with a new or relapsed oncology/hematology diagnosis. Laura’s favorite aspects of her role as a CCLS includes helping a patient and family navigate a new diagnosis, utilizing bibliotherapy for education and therapeutic conversations, working with support organizations such as Beads of Courage, Sheets from Home, and Flashes of Hope, as well as, playing all forms of UNO in the hospital classroom. At Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital, we pride ourselves in the interdisciplinary team approach, specifically on our Pediatric Support Services Team which encompasses Child Life, Healing Arts, and School Program.

Heather Wiselogle spent 15 years in a traditional elementary school prior to transitioning to the classroom at Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at Ascension St. Vincent in Indianapolis. Since 2018 she has supported over 130 oncology patients and families with school needs in and out of the hospital before, during, and after treatment. She also serves as hospital teacher/liaison to other inpatient units and outpatient clinics including, but not limited to, PICU, pediatric acute care units, burn unit and outpatient burn clinic, TNICU and adult units with adolescent and/or young adult patients, Women’s Hospital/NICU, and speciality outpatient clinics. The hospital classroom is utilized for school sessions for inpatients (with flexibility to do bedside sessions) to provide patients with a “school away from school” opportunity to keep their academic goals on track in light of an extended hospital stay. Heather also provides liaison and advocacy work to connect school/home/hospital to support patients’ learning needs, re-entry to school, IEP/504 planning and accommodation recommendations. At Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital, we pride ourselves in the interdisciplinary team approach, specifically on our Pediatric Support Services Team which encompasses Child Life, Healing Arts, Pet Therapy and School Program.

Session Description:
Child life services and hospital teachers often align on similar goals for children and families during hospitalizations. Collaboration, routine, and play improve our ability to build rapport and fill the gaps caused by a new diagnosis, extended hospitalization, and treatment journey. Take a closer look with us at how the Child Life Services and School Program at Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital serves our oncology and hematology patients and families – before, during, and after treatment.

Fletcer Place

Roundtable

New Member Orientation

 

Presented By: Joni Hildreth, Levine's Children's Hospital & Beth Stuchell, C.S. Mott Children's Hospital

Joni Hildreth began her early career as an itinerant teacher serving exceptional children from Birth to Kindergarten, while working as a part-time Child Life Specialist. She is the School Support Coordinator for Levine Children’s Hospital in Charlotte, NC. She provides liaison support between the patient’s family, school, and medical team for both acute and clinical care patients. Joni is a huge advocate for hospital homebound and oversees the delivery of educational supports. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Education and a Master of Arts in Somatic Psychology, Dance Movement Therapy. She has over 23 years of experience working in the field of education and health services.

Beth Stuchell is the School Liaison for the Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, Blood and Marrow Transplant Program at University of Michigan Health, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. Beth began her professional career as an elementary and middle school teacher, then obtained a social work degree. Beth started at University of Michigan Health as a medical social worker with the Pediatric HemOnc and Transplant Program, then transitioned to the role of a school liaison in 2013. Areas of interest include oncology survivorship, addressing health-related barriers to educational and vocational opportunities in the teen and young adult cancer population and fostering multi-disciplinary research collaborations.

Session Description:

New to HEAL or perhaps this is your first conference experience? Learn more about our organization, opportunties to network, and ways to become more involved.

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11:15am – 11:30am

Break

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11:30am – 12:30pm

Breakout Sessions

Alexander Ballroom

Panel Discussion

Building a Statewide Educational Support Program for All Childhood Cancer Patients and Survivors

Presented By: Amy Fender, MEd, Susan Lindsay, BS, and Alma Morgan, ASK Childhood Cancer Foundation

Amy Fender joined the ASK Childhood Cancer Foundation in January of 2023 after teaching elementary school for 17 years in the public school systems of southwest Virginia. As an Education Navigator at Carilion Children’s in Roanoke, VA, she works with childhood cancer patients and survivors to ensure they are receiving an appropriate education. Amy attends school meetings with parents, provides staff and class inservices, and assists students with any learning needs during hospital stays and clinic visits.

 

Susan Lindsay joined ASK Childhood Cancer Foundation as Director of Programs in Fall of 2021. Since that time, she has led the statewide expansion of ASK educational & financial support to serve childhood cancer families treated at five different pediatric cancer treatment centers across Virginia. Susan has significant experience in both the corporate and non-profit sectors leading educational, mental wellness, and customer service programs. She looks forward to continuing to grow support for childhood cancer patients, survivors, and their families across Virginia.

Session Description:
This panel will describe how ASK Childhood Cancer Foundation has successfully developed a statewide educational program for childhood cancer patients and survivors. Learn how ASK’s fifty-year partnership with Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, successful support programs, and sustained General Assembly advocacy led to funding for educational support at the five pediatric cancer treatment centers in Virginia. The ASK Education Navigator team will discuss how this program provides equitable education support to all Virginia childhood cancer patients and survivors.

Renaissance Place

Lecture

Assessment 101 for Hospital Teachers: Identifying Patient’s Individual Learning Needs Through Formal and Informal Assessment

Presented By: Rebecca Grysko, PhD, CBIS, Nemours Children's Hospital, FL

Rebeca Grysko, PhD, CBIS is the School Program Coordinator at Nemours Children’s Hospital in Orlando, FL. She oversees the delivery of educational support and school liaison services for patients across all inpatient units. As a Special Education Teacher and Certified Brain Injury Specialist, Dr. Grysko is committed to improving educational outcomes for students with chronic health conditions and/or disabilities. Her areas of specialty include reading assessment and intervention and school re-entry support for children with acquired brain injury.

Session Description:
Assessment plays a critical role in determining how to best support each patient’s unique learning needs. This presentation will discuss several types of assessments that can be used to identify patient’s academic strengths and areas of need in the hospital setting. The presenter will share examples of how assessment data can be used to formulate individual learning goals for patients and to inform school re-entry recommendations.

Fletcher Place

Roundtable

Developing a Collaborative Communication Model to Address Absenteeism for Students with Chronic Medical Conditions

Presented By: Stefanie Hayes, BSEd, and Megan Connolly, PhD, Children's National Hospital

Stefanie Hayes is an Education Specialist in the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s National Hospital, where she has supported pediatric hematology, oncology, and blood and marrow transplant patients for the past 8 years. In this role, she works with patients during and after treatment with educational coordination, planning, and goal-setting and has helped lead an effort to make hospital-based teaching available as a standard of care for patients. Prior to becoming an Education Specialist, she worked in the Volunteer Services Department at Children’s National for 3 years. Stefanie has also worked for a non-profit organization, Best Buddies, where she fostered acceptance and inclusion in her community. Stefanie received her Bachelor of Science in Education, with a focus on special education, from Miami University in Ohio.

 

Megan Connolly, Ph.D., is a pediatric psychologist within Children’s National Hospital. She provides clinical psychology services to patients and families in the Divisions of Hematology, Oncology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation. She also serves as an assistant professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dr. Connolly collaborates closely with the education and medical teams to support patients’ school functioning, including school re-entry following treatment or hospitalizations, school accommodations, and coping with medical conditions in the school setting. Dr. Connolly’s clinical research program focuses on improving quality of life, including school functioning, for patients with sickle cell disease through non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and interventions to enhance a patient and family’s management of chronic illness. Dr. Connolly received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Northwestern University.

Session Description:
School attendance can be one of the most challenging aspects of school functioning for children with chronic illnesses. School teams work closely with families and medical teams to support a student’s school functioning; however, lack of knowledge of the medical condition and communication challenges may hinder well-intentioned efforts. Identifying communication barriers and developing collaborative communication solutions between families, school teams, and medical teams is necessary to address absenteeism and increase attendance for students with chronic medical conditions.
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12:30-1:30pm

Alexander Ballroom

Lunch & Regional Connections

Lunch will be provided.

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12:30-2:00pm

Vendor Showcase

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2:00pm-3:00pm

Breakout Sessions

Alexander Ballroom

Lecture

Hearing Their Voices: Exploring Children’s Perspectives and Enhancing Communication in Pediatric Visits

Presented By: Michele Capruso, MEd, University of Perugia, Italy

Michele Capurso is an Associate Professor of Educational and Developmental Psychology at the University of Perugia, Italy. He began his career as a schoolteacher and later worked as a hospital teacher. He also served as the Head of Practical Teacher Training programs at the University of Perugia. Capurso has authored numerous books and articles on topics such as children’s fears and coping mechanisms, understanding of illness, didactics, and communication. He has been a member of the Board of HOPE for eight years and served as President for two years. He is the founder and current Chief Editor of the journal Continuity in Education.

Session Description:

We report here on a retrospective and narrative-based qualitative research aimed at investigating children lived experiences of a medical visit, and on a subsequent paper-based facilitation intervention aimed at improving children’s direct questioning to their physician.

Renaissance Place

Lecture

STEM in the Hospital: An Implicit Statement of Hope

Presented By: Marcus Green, MEd, BS and Ellen Lowe, MEd, UNC Hospital School, Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools

Marcus Green, MEd – STEM Education, is the Science Teacher and STEM Coordinator for the UNC Hospital School in Chapel Hill, NC. He is a lead teacher on the Pediatric medical floors specializing in students with psychiatric and/or gastrointestinal issues and is a support teacher with the Child/Adolescent Psych Unit and the Eating Disorders Unit. He teaches weekly Makerspace lessons (hands-on Science focusing on the Engineering Design Process) to various groups of students all around the hospital. He also specializes in origami, teaching students and parents how to creatively fold paper into intricate designs and has earned the moniker “Dr. Origami.”

 

Ellen Lowe, MEd – Secondary Mathematics, is the Math Teacher and Academic Troubadour Coordinator for the UNC Hospital School in Chapel Hill, NC. In her role as a math teacher, she works with students in the Neuroscience Hospital and Pediatric Hospital, offering both group and individual instruction in grade-level math and math extensions. Additionally, she assists in conducting weekly Makerspace lessons, emphasizing hands-on science with a focus on the Engineering Design Process for various groups of students throughout the hospital. As the Academic Troubadour Coordinator, Ellen organizes virtual educational field trips with outreach educators at North Carolina Zoo and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science. This program emphasizes the School Improvement Goals focused on STEM Education.

Session Description:
As a hospital school staff, we develop and utilize STEM/Makerspace activities with the students we serve on a weekly basis. In addition to HEAL Conference attendees participating in a live Makerspace activity, this presentation will also delve into the research behind our practices, the benefits for both the students and the teachers, and provide ideas for implementing STEM/Makerspace activities in almost any hospital setting.

Fletcher Place

Roundtable

Standardizing the Field of Hospital Educator and Academic Liaison Practice

Presented By: Christie Ruehl, JD, MBA and Kyle Landry, MEd, Children's Wisconsin

Christie Ruehl is the Senior Program Manager for the Educational Achievement Partnership Program (EAPP) at Children’s Wisconsin. Christie’s path to the EAPP began as an education and healthcare advocate for her brother, who was born with a complex medical condition that caused learning difficulties. Christie connects experience in law, research, and advocacy to guide school success for families affected by chronic illness. Christie earned a Juris Doctorate from Stetson University College of Law (2006), a Master of Business Administration from Stetson University (2009), and a Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of Wisconsin – Madison (2002).

Kyle Landry, former Milwaukee Public Schools elementary educator, is the founder/manager of the Educational Achievement Program at Children’s Wisconsin. Over 9+ years of program growth, Landry has built a team of experienced educators specially trained in neurodevelopmental sequelae of complex illness, including mental and behavioral health, and the related complexities of social determinants of health. Landry’s work standardizing/validating assessment, intervention, and outcomes processes, as well as associated tools, has led to several research grants, authorship in a nursing textbook, and two recent medical journal publications. Landry holds a Bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education and a Master’s Degree in Cultural Foundations of Community and Education from UW – Milwaukee. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Healthcare Leadership to round out her expertise braiding together the complex systems of education and healthcare.

Session Description:
While the field of hospital educators and academic liaison (HEAL) services is growing, there are no established standards within the field. A nationwide collaborative of pediatric hospitals recently established core principles and practices for School-Friendly Health Systems (SFHS). The SFHS framework provides an exciting opportunity to align the function of HEAL services with the SFHS 5 core principles. Roundtable participants will brainstorm ideas for creating a complementary HEAL framework and promoting standards of HEAL practice.
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3:00PM-3:15PM

Break

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3:15PM-4:15PM

Breakout Sessions

Alexander Ballroom

Lecture

Spirituality and the Work of the Hospital Educator/Academic Liaison

Presented By: Alex Lion DO, MPH, Riley Children's Health

Alex Lion, DO MPH, is a pediatric neuro-oncologist whose scholarship focuses on the integration of patient religion and spirituality into their care, with special attention to religious and spiritual diversity. He has co-authored multiple publications in this area including ethics publications on physician prayer and how to address parents praying for a miracle, a review of chaplain notes with insights how to integrate chaplain care into medical practice, as well as a pilot study of interprofessional spiritual care in pediatric hematology/oncology. Dr. Lion currently holds a grant to provide team-based spiritual care training across the statewide IU Health system. Dr. Lion is the co-director of the Religion and Spirituality in Medicine Scholarly Concentration at the IU School of Medicine. He is also the associate director of the Evans Center for the Integration of Spiritual and Religious Values at IU Health, in which he hosts a quarterly spirituality research colloquium. On a national level, Dr. Lion sits on the executive leadership committee for the Conference on Medicine and Religion, which he is leading a team from IU in hosting in 2024 in Indianapolis.

Session Description:
This session will answer the questions:  What are the diverse ways spirituality shows up in healthcare settings? What is spiritual distress and how does it relate to patients’ experience of school? What are the ways that the hospital educator / academic liaison’s work meets spiritual needs of patients to find meaning and purpose throughout the experience of illness?

Renaissance Place

Lecture

Healing Hearts Through the Arts

Presented By: Lani Gonzales, CCHt, QHHt, Esq., Ad Astra Awakening

Inspired to speak for those who could not speak for themselves, Lani became a lawyer at the age of 23. Although she built the picture-perfect life, Lani fought a silent battle with depression, anxiety, and chronic PTSD. She spent over 10 years in counseling, and Lani finally found true healing and unshakable inner peace by exploring the subconscious mind. Lani returned to school and is now a clinical and quantum healing hypnotherapist. She also trained with gurus, shamans, and healers around the world to cultivate her gifts as an intuitive healer. Lani shared her healing journey in her first book, Rebirth of a Sage. Untethered from the trauma that once controlled her life, Lani learned to wield the love and light within and live a life of purpose. It is her mission to help others do the same.

Session Description:
Delve into the powerful intersection of mindfulness, emotional regulation, and creative expression through art and play. Attendees will discover practical strategies and insights for helping children build emotional intelligence, resilience, and inner peace in a fun and engaging way.

Fletcher Place

Roundtable

School Transition Planning for Students Leaving Psychiatric Treatment

Presented By: Mindy Ellott, MS, Veritas Collaborative

Mindy Elliott is the Director of Education for Veritas Collaborative, a specialty hospital system for the treatment of eating disorders. She developed the academic programming since Veritas opened in 2012, and is dedicated to providing individualized academic and transition services to meet the unique needs of each patient-student. Mindy serves on the executive board of the HEAL Association, is an Associate Editor of the international journal, Continuity in Education (CiE), and has presented dozens of workshops on hospital school practices, transition planning, eating disorder effects on the student, twice exceptionality, and the path to submitting articles for publication in the CiE journal.

Session Description:
Join this Roundtable Discussion to learn and share best practices for planning appropriate and supportive transitions between a psychiatric hospital and school. Research on this topic will be shared including a published literature review authored by HEAL members. All disciplines are welcome, and this session is especially helpful for those working with students diagnosed with a mental illness. Come find a network of professionals who you can collaborate with all year!
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4:30pm-5:30pm

Welcome Reception

Day 2 – Thursday, May 2, 2024

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8:00am – 8:30am

Conference Lobby

Registration and Nutrition Bar opens

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8:30am-8:45am

Alexander Ballroom

Welcome & Announcements

Presented By: Kelly Ihejiawu, HEAL President, Children's Medical Center, Dallas, TX

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8:45am –9:45am

Alexander Ballroom

General Session

When Multiple Systems Fail: Contextualizing Disparities to Inform Interventions for Diverse Youth

Presented By: Julia LaMotte, PhD, HSPP, Director of Psychosocial Services, Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, and Stem Cell Transplant; Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics; Department of Pediatrics - Indiana University School of Medicine

Dr. Julia LaMotte (she/her) is a pediatric psychologist who specializes in working with children, adolescents, and young adults with chronic medical conditions in the divisions of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology & Nephrology at Indiana University School of Medicine and Riley Hospital for Children. As a clinical psychologist, Dr. LaMotte’s embedded role within an interdisciplinary medical team takes the principles of psychology, applies them to pediatric health through evidence-based methodology, and reduces access barriers to quality mental health care. Academically, Dr. LaMotte co-facilitates a cross-cultural empathy through mindful reflective practice course designed to promote critical understanding of racism in medicine for pediatric residents. Her commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice has been recognized by her peers as the 2022 recipient of the Indiana University School of Medicine Outstanding Faculty Commitment to Diversity and the 2023 inaugural Faculty Diversity Champion awardee.

Dr. LaMotte received her Doctorate of Philosophy (PhD) in Clinical Psychology from the University of Georgia, completed residency as an Integrated Behavioral Health Scholar at Dell Children’s Medical Center in Austin, TX, and fellowship at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She was selected as a Health Equity Scholar through the Cambridge Health Alliance and Harvard Medical School. Building upon her interests and commitment to advocacy, Dr. LaMotte is a 2023 JELF Advocacy Scholar through the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology.

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9:45am-10:00am

Break

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10:00am-11:00am

Breakout Sessions

Alexander Ballroom

Panel Discussion

Microschooling: Meeting Every Student’s Unique Needs in Fully Customized Learning Environments

Presented By: Ashley Soifer, Lizette Valles, and Jill Haskins, National Microschooling Center

Jill Haskins, Indiana Field Coordinator for the National Microschooling Center, is helping to build an ecosystem of permissionless education in Indiana. She is the Executive Director and a Classroom Teacher at Streams of Hope Christian School located in Fort Wayne, IN. Streams of Hope is a 1st-12th grade microschool with mixed age classrooms focusing on fostering independent learners. Jill is also an Indiana state licensed teacher, a former public school teacher, and homeschooling mom of 3.

Lizette Valles, M.Ed., is the founder of Compass Educators: A Holistic Educational Services Center & Ellemercito Academy, a Los Angeles-based microschool with a focus on experiential/place-based learning. Her mission is to nurture students who think critically, develop a growth mindset, and demonstrate empathy. She is dedicated to reimagining education, implementing trauma-informed approaches in out-of-system school models such as the fast-growing small school movement, and providing guidance to families seeking personalized learning environments that will best serve their children. For over 16 years, her career in education has included teaching middle/high school English, serving as a K-12 librarian, publishing a bilingual children’s book, launching supportive alternative education programs for families, organizing the largest free virtual summer camp during the pandemic, founding Compass Educators in 2020 and Ellemericito Academy in 2021, and growing the microschooling ecosystem in California as the California & Spanish-speaking Field Coordinator with the National Microschooling Center.

Session Description:
Children with medical and mental health needs require new schooling models. Microschooling provides a solution for every child to continue learning and growing despite their health struggles. This innovative way of educating offers a whole-child approach that caters to students’ unique needs. It allows for flexibility and removes systemic educational constraints providing a transformative learning pathway. Incorporating customized educational frameworks into the healthcare system greatly benefits students who necessitate a decentralized, student-focused approach to education.

Renaissance Place

Lecture

Building Self-Management and Self-Advocacy Skills in Students with Sickle Cell Disease: Communicating Health Needs in the School Setting.

Presented By: Donna Romack, EdD, Riley Hospital for Children

Bio coming soon.

Session Description:
Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a lifelong chronic medical condition. Complications of SCD affect children as they learn to manage their health needs at school. An investigation evaluated the impact of equipping children aged 8-14 with essential SCD education, self-care, and self-management guidelines to encourage self-advocating behaviors at school and explore how perceived racial bias influences students’ pursuit of equitable support for their health and educational needs.

Fletcher Place

Roundtable

Holistic Lesson Planning: A Roundtable Discussion of Lesson Planning Best Practices for Hospital/Homebound Students

Presented By: Eleanor Knott, MA, Curriculum and Instruction, Dallas ISD Hospital/Homebound Department

Eleanor Knott is a Dallas ISD Hospital / Homebound Teacher and Math Instructional Specialist. She is passionate about educating students in non-traditional settings with thoughtfulness, rigor, and care. She holds a Masters in Curriculum and Instruction and spent 10 years teaching high school math before transitioning to primarily Homebound teaching. Eleanor loves getting to collaborate with students, families, and schools to come up with the best plan for her Homebound students. Outside of work, she enjoys quality time and taking walks with her husband Mike, daughter Sally, and sweet old dog Jack.

Session Description:
Lesson planning for hospital/homebound students requires us to think about many factors beyond traditional district issued curriculum frameworks. In this structured roundtable discussion we will share experiences and best practices for planning instruction while also taking into account medical needs, medication effects, extended absences, home campus collaboration, academic intervention needs, IEPs, 504s, and so much more. We will discuss strategies for getting stakeholder (student, parent, home campus/district, classroom teachers, counselors, social workers, doctors, etc) collaboration for lesson planning purposes.
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11:00am-11:15am

Break

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11:15am-12:15pm

Breakout Sessions

Alexander Ballroom

Lecture

Helping Schools with Instructional Plans for Students with Acquired Brain Injury and TBI

Presented By: Gayle Domsch, EdD, Children's Mercy Kansas City

Gayle Domsch earned her Ed.D. in Educational Leadership from St. Louis University, a Master’s in Learning Disabilities from the University of Missouri-Kansas City, and a B.S. in Education from Concordia University-Seward, Nebraska. She has a variety of teaching experience including: five years of regular (single classroom, multi-age, elementary and middle school), three years of gifted instruction, over twenty years in special education (both resource and self-contained), four years of graduate and undergraduate courses, and ten years as a Hospital Based School Teacher. One of her greatest joys is that both her sons and one grandchild are also teachers.

Session Description:
The presentation shares how a model of universal school needs assessment and risk based, tiered intervention allowed for the most appropriate level of services at the right time for each patient and family. The model was able to meet the Psychosocial Standard of Care for school services. Level of risk was related to the amount of time needed to serve each family. Families and medical providers reported satisfaction with the model of service.

Renaissance Place

Lecture

Partnerships Multiply Teaching Hands

Presented By: Sarah Steinke MEd, MA, Kristin Privett, MSEdPsych, and Catherine Parts, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Sarah Steinke has spent her career as a hospital teacher for 23 years. Sarah has taught a variety of patient populations including cancer, bone marrow transplant, psychiatry and complex care. Prior to her time at the hospital, she taught high school social studies and is a mom to 3 kids. Currently she is a School Specialist serving the patients with the highest educational risk for The Center for School Services. She also partners with The University of Cincinnati acting as an adjunct instructor who supervises student teachers. At the hospital she also coordinates many community and university volunteers and student teachers and heads the teacher licensure for the hospital.

 

Kristin has been providing school support to inpatient students at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital for 11 years. She taught in the classroom at Cincinnati Public for 13 years prior coming to CCHMC. Kristin has a BS in Elementary Education (K-8) and an MS in Educational Psychology. When she is not problem solving with her students, she is spending her time with her husband and 3 children.

Session Description:
The reacquisition of skills is only the beginning of the recovery process for students with acquired brain injury. Their brains are literally rewired and their new learning is impacted for life. Helping schools with the information they need to facilitate an instructional program for students with traumatic or acquired brain injury is perhaps the most essential part of the recovery process that the hospital-based schoolteacher or academic liaison can accomplish.

Fletcher Place

Roundtable

Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital: Virtual Tour and Program Sharing

Presented By: Heather Wiselogle, Peyton Manning Children's Hospital

Heather Wiselogle spent 15 years in a traditional elementary school prior to transitioning to the classroom at Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at Ascension St. Vincent in Indianapolis. Since 2018 she has supported over 130 oncology patients and families with school needs in and out of the hospital before, during, and after treatment. She also serves as hospital teacher/liaison to other inpatient units and outpatient clinics including, but not limited to, PICU, pediatric acute care units, burn unit and outpatient burn clinic, TNICU and adult units with adolescent and/or young adult patients, Women’s Hospital/NICU, and speciality outpatient clinics. The hospital classroom is utilized for school sessions for inpatients (with flexibility to do bedside sessions) to provide patients with a “school away from school” opportunity to keep their academic goals on track in light of an extended hospital stay. Heather also provides liaison and advocacy work to connect school/home/hospital to support patients’ learning needs, re-entry to school, IEP/504 planning and accommodation recommendations. At Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital, we pride ourselves in the interdisciplinary team approach, specifically on our Pediatric Support Services Team which encompasses Child Life, Healing Arts, Pet Therapy and School Program.

Session Description:

Get to know our local colleagues and their program. Peyton Manning Children’s will showcase their hospital and highlight the great work they do.

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12:15pm-1:45pm

Alexander Ballroom

Awards Luncheon

A Personal Story

Presented By: Lalia Susini, Co-Founder LATE Clothing LA

At just 11 years old Lalia Susini was on track to play professional soccer, her lifelong dream. She had the determination, athleticism and as a nationally ranked track athlete, she had the speed. While acting on ABC’s hit show, Station 19, Lalia would change into her soccer uniform and run straight from set to the soccer field. She was able to do it all and in her spare time was an up-and-coming BMX racer, trying to qualify for California’s state BMX circuit. Everything changed on October 22, 2020 when she was involved in an accident that left her with a severe traumatic brain injury, stroke and left side paralysis. Lalia came into the Cedars Sinai emergency department with not much hope and major blood loss. Just on the ride to the hospital paramedics had to pull over twice to revive her. She survived the first night and doctors told her family that with the severity of her brain damage that we were going to have to take it day by day. Days turned into weeks and weeks into months and Lalia defied the odds. Once Lalia was out of critical condition, she was medically transferred to CHLA where she would re-learn to walk and adapt to partial left side paralysis. 

After inpatient and outpatient hospital stays, surgeries and intense physical therapy at CHLA, she is living up to her goal.  There have been ups and downs and CHLA has been by her side the entire time. As Lalia enters the hospital weekly, she updates the security guards with what she’s been doing at school and as she enters the hospital cafeteria the chefs and workers ask her how basketball practice was this week. Lalia has more that just doctors and nurses that support her at CHLA, she has what seems like the support of every employee at CHLA. On the rehabilitation floor, she has made lifelong bonds with children from all over the United States who made CHLA their healing sanctuary too.  

She has lived at CHLA, gone to school at CHLA and will always be devoted the hospital that has made its mission to care for ALL children. 

UPDATE:  Lalia is currently attending Sierra Canyon for high school. She is enrolled in honor classes and plays on their basketball team.

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1:30-m-2:30pm

Vendor Showcase

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1:30pm-2:30pm

Poster Presentations

Poster

Heart Cart: Empowering Children to Actively Engage in and Express Art

Presented By: Ji Yoon Chung, MEd, MFA, McGill University, Seoul National University Children’s Hospital School

Session Description:

The Heart Cart project was designed with the imagination of “What if the cart is filled with art works containing the stories of children in the hospital?” It was envisioned as a transformation of the medical carts into artistic vehicles with artworks that encapsulate the experiences of children who are hospitalized. Hear Cart is filled with stories of young patients in the hospital and fosters communication through works of art.

Poster

Kidney Kash and Brave Bucks…Incentive based Financial Literacy with the Kidney and Heart Carts.

Presented By: Kellee Clevenger, BEd and Lindsay DeWilde, BS, Riley Hospital for Children

Kellee Clevenger, B.Ed is an Educational Liaison at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, IN. Kellee specializes working with patients in the Outpatient Dialysis Unit and all Nephrology patients. Kellee works closely with her patient’s school to ensure they have the support they need while they are receiving dialysis 3 days per week. Kellee has been a hospital educator at Riley Hospital for Children for 8 years.

Lindsay DeWilde, BS is an Educational Liaison at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, IN. Lindsay specializes in Heart Transplant, Burn/Plastic Surgery, Cardiology, and Rehab patients. Lindsay follows her heart transplant patients for their entire school career post-transplant to ensure they receive the accommodations needed. Lindsay has been a hospital educator at Riley Hospital for Children for 12 years.

Session Description:
This is a donor funded financial literacy program for patients in the outpatient dialysis unit and the inpatient cardiology unit. Patients can earn “Kidney Kash” or “Brave Bucks” for many different incentives such as completing assignments, walking around the unit, getting poked, keeping their fluid levels in the appropriate range, etc. Once a week, patients are able to go shopping on the “Kidney Kart” or the “Heart Cart” and use the money that they have earned. Patients are also expected to pay bills so they can learn real life lessons on how to manage money.

Poster

Parent Desired Resources and Support for School Following Cancer

Presented By: Elaina Parrillo, RN, Mary Jo Gamper, Lisa B. Carey, Johns Hopkins University

Elaina is a DNP-PNP/PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. For her dissertation, she is studying pediatric cancer survivorship and how parent experiences influence their child’s transition to school during or after treatment. Specifically, she is interested in how parents’ experience of support influences child psychosocial outcomes. After completion of her program, she plans to combine both research and practice as a pediatric nurse practitioner to optimize quality of life of the child and family, reduce the burden of late effects, and improve interdisciplinary communication.

 

Rachel Smilow is the Program Manager for Science Journeys and METEOR. She received her MA in Museum Studies from Johns Hopkins University and a BA in History from Notre Dame of Maryland University.

Session Description:
We conducted a qualitative study in which we interviewed parents of pediatric cancer survivors to understand desired supports to address post-cancer schooling challenges. Parents desire age-specific resources, guides for discussions between parents and school administrators, school advocacy training, and help navigating treatment effects in school. Parents also discussed expanding survivorship care to include conversations from the medical team about school, standardized processes for neuropsychology evaluation/home and hospital, support groups, and additional academic support.

Poster

Read, Rest, Recover: A Pilot Pediatric Inpatient Program

Presented By: Amy McGrory, MA, CCLS, Cincinnati Children's

Amy McGrory MA CCLS has been working as a Certified Child Life Specialist (CCLS) for almost 14 years at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC). She works as an inpatient unit CCLS on the Transitional Care Center (TCC) and A3N (surgery). Amy is also a backup handler for two of CCHMC’s facility dogs and does a weekly pre-school story time with one or more of them on Seacrest Studio called Dog Tales. Amy has three grown children and lives with her husband in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Session Description:

Upon admission to three pilot units, children age 9-years and under receive an “RRR Bundle” featuring an age-appropriate book, a menu of reading resources at CCHMC and a bookmark describing the importance of shared reading and limiting screen time, with a QR code linked to a free, reading themed mobile app for parents (Reading Bees) developed at CCHMC.

Poster

Science Journeys

Presented By: Naomi Luban, MD and Rachel Smilow, MA, Children's National Hospital

Dr. Naomi Luban is the Vice Chair of Academic Affairs, Senior Hematologist, PI of several NIH grants. She is a tenured Professor of Pediatrics and Pathology at George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Her research interests are focused on clinical and translational investigations of transfusion safety and include studies of infectious and non-infectious complications of transfusion including RBC and HLA alloimmunization, graft versus host disease and evidence-based transfusion practices. Studies include the molecular characterization of genes associated with alloimmunization and genetic modifiers of hemoglobin F expression. Dr. Luban has served the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other professional associations in a number of roles including Special Emphasis Panels and review groups and as the transfusion consultant for a series of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-supported transfusion studies.

 

Rachel Smilow is the Program Manager for Science Journeys and METEOR. She received her MA in Museum Studies from Johns Hopkins University and a BA in History from Notre Dame of Maryland University.

Session Description:
Science Journeys (“Journeys”) engages a unique audience of learners: children and families navigating hospitalization accompanied by a loss of educational opportunities. ”Journeys” incorporates lessons learned from our previously funded NIH grant based in the out-of-school time setting of public libraries, community centers and in home hands on STEM programming. Participants in “Journeys” develop STEM knowledge and skills, improving their understanding of their health conditions, increasing their health agency and engagement with their healthcare team.

Poster

Starting School Strong: ​Providing 1:1 Education to Caregivers of Children with CHD to Increase Knowledge of and Advocacy within the Early Childhood Special Education System

Presented By: Sarah Johnson, MS, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital

Sarah has been an education liaison at Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital for the past five years. In her current role, she is part of a multidisciplinary team in the NICU-Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Program (NCNP): Child and Adolescent Clinic. This program follows patients at risk for educational difficulties based on their medical profile and prior history of congenital heart disease, heart transplantation, and/or prematurity. With a background teaching special education and master’s degree in early childhood education, Sarah is passionate about collaboration with patient families and school teams to optimize patient outcomes in the school setting.

Session Description:
In this pilot study, we hypothesized that providing 1:1 caregiver education about the benefits of participation in ECSE, how to access services, and caregiver rights and responsibilities within the public education system could improve caregiver comfort navigating the system and advocating for necessary services. Though time and resource heavy, this intervention proved to be effective in increasing caregiver knowledge and patient participation in ECSE.

Poster

Story & STEAM: Putting Wonder in Wait Time

Presented By: Rachel Meyen, MEd Brianne Starin, and Hannah Bohlen, Duke University Medical Center & Durham Public Schools

We are a team of hospital school teachers at Duke University Medical Center. After working together at a nearby elementary school in Durham for many years, we slowly transitioned to the Hospital School at Duke and have tried to bring a fresh perspective to educational programming at the hospital, using our combined experience in gifted education, special education, clubs and other extracurriculars to create out-of-the-box learning opportunities at the hospital and bring joy to children and families alike.

Session Description:
Time in the hospital often seems to stand still. Minutes tick into hours, results run late, and children spend a lot of time waiting, while their boredom and anxiety grow. Story & STEAM packets pair a high-interest picture book with a related STEAM activity; the packets include a QR code for an audio/visual presentation of the story and the materials needed for the activity, thus helping to bust boredom and distract worried minds.

Poster

Summer Camp in the Hospital…A New Take on Summer School

Presented By: Rachel Meyen, MEd Brianne Starin, Hannah Bohlen, and Nancy Bryson Evans, Duke University Medical Center & Durham Public Schools

We are a team of hospital school teachers at Duke University Medical Center. After working together at a nearby elementary school in Durham for many years, we slowly transitioned to the Hospital School at Duke and have tried to bring a fresh perspective to educational programming at the hospital, using our combined experience in gifted education, special education, clubs and other extracurriculars to create out-of-the-box learning opportunities at the hospital and bring joy to children and families alike.

Session Description:
While in the hospital, children need positive, social interactions, to problem solve and to create, not just during the school year, but during the summer, as well. Each summer, hospital school teachers work to run four week-long, thematic “summer camps” to help bring a little fun to pediatric patients, better their social-emotional health and allow them to do something that many children outside the hospital are able to do in the summer…go to camp.
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2:30pm-3:30pm

Breakout Sessions

Alexander Ballroom

Lecture

Measuring Our Impact

Presented By: Lenora Nardelli, MEd and Deborah South, MEd, CBIS, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Lenora Nardelli is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati where she received a Bachelor of Science in Education and a Master of Education in Special Education. She began her teaching career in the public-school setting and taught at the primary level for over ten years. In 2017, she began her work at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, as a School Specialist, providing liaison support between the patient’s family, school, and medical team for patients with chronic health conditions. In addition to serving as a school liaison, Lenora is passionate about educating those in the medical field regarding special education and facilitating in the efforts of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital to be a School-Friendly Health System.

 

Debbie South is a School Liaison Specialist with the Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and a member of the multidisciplinary team in the Complex Brain Health and Wellness Clinic. For the past ten years, she has provided support and recommendations to families and school teams when planning patients’ return to school after hospitalization with inpatient rehabilitation. Prior to her liaison position with CCHMC, she taught science for 22 years in both the private and public school settings. She received both her undergraduate and master’s degrees in education from Xavier University with a graduate certification from George Washington University in Brain Injury and Transition Services. She recently obtained her certificate as a Brain Injury Specialist through Brain Injury Association of America.

Session Description:
Our program has implemented a quantitative method to measure the impact of our work upon the improvement of patient’s educational outcomes during an acute or chronic medical condition. Over the course of four years, our team has trialed the methodology of Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) as a model; however, it has transformed from how it was initially intended. While GAS is proven to be a successful tool in areas such as OT and PT, we realized that our role was difficult to conform to such a model. Therefore, we’ve continued to evolve into a system of developing goals with the families and then tracking their progress or outcome. Based on our process for developing such measures, we have found that other institutions are also trying to implement a similar tool.

Renaissance Place

Lecture

Reframing Late-Effects of Childhood Cancer as a Chronic Medical Condition to Support Educational Attainment

Presented By: Lisa B. Carey, Laina Parrillo, and Lisa Jacobson, Johns Hopkins University

Elaina is a DNP-PNP/PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. For her dissertation, she is studying pediatric cancer survivorship and how parent experiences influence their child’s transition to school during or after treatment. Specifically, she is interested in how parents’ experience of support influences child psychosocial outcomes. After completion of her program, she plans to combine both research and practice as a pediatric nurse practitioner to optimize quality of life of the child and family, reduce the burden of late effects, and improve interdisciplinary communication.

Session Description:
Childhood cancer often produces cognitive late-effects, resulting in learning difficulties and poorer educational attainment.  Schooling resources for children impacted by cancer most often focus on the transition back to school after treatment, rather than long-term educational support needs. This presentation examines how reframing childhood cancer late effects as a chronic medical condition may support better communication about late-effects and improve educational outcomes.

Fletcher Place

Roundtable

Bilingual Education in the Hospital Setting

Presented By: Rose Aguilar, Covenant Children's Hospital School Program

Session Description:
Roundtable discussion on how to address best practices in the hospital school setting when working with English Language Learners and their families.
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3:30PM-3:45PM

Break

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3:45PM-4:45PM

Breakout Sessions

Alexander Ballroom

Panel Discussion

Adapting Educational Resources for Long-Term School Support in Cancer Survivorship

Presented By: Lisa B. Carey, Elaina Parrillo, RN, Kaitlin Murtagh, and Clifton Thornton

Elaina is a DNP-PNP/PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. For her dissertation, she is studying pediatric cancer survivorship and how parent experiences influence their child’s transition to school during or after treatment. Specifically, she is interested in how parents’ experience of support influences child psychosocial outcomes. After completion of her program, she plans to combine both research and practice as a pediatric nurse practitioner to optimize quality of life of the child and family, reduce the burden of late effects, and improve interdisciplinary communication.

Session Description:
Many childhood cancer survivors experience long-term effects of treatment that impact their success in school. However, limited resources exist to provide long-term support in school to survivors. What can we learn from educational resources that provide long-term school support for other chronic pediatric conditions, such sickle cell disease (SCD)? Our goal is to review resources used to provide long-term support to children with SCD and discuss how we may adapt these resources for survivors.

Renaissance Place

Lecture

Balancing Care and Commitment: Stress Management for Student Support Professionals

Presented By: Baron Warren, Addiction Therapist, Cuts & Coaching, LLC

Baron Warren is a national speaker and life coach who works with individuals in the area of personal growth. His passionate speaking style and his tough love approach has motivated, inspired and influence many men around the country and beyond.As a Life Coach since 2012, Barron helped clients break through the obstacles that hold them back in life. By asking the right questions and empowering them with the proper tools and techniques, he helps clients take action in pursuit of their goals and ambitions.

Session Description:
This presentation offers stress management strategies tailored for professionals supporting students with medical and mental health needs. It covers self-care, collaboration, time management, stress reduction techniques, setting boundaries, continuing education, self-reflection, and emotional support. These strategies are essential for maintaining well-being and effectiveness in a demanding educational support role.

Fletcher Place

Roundtable

Better Together: A Collaborative Approach to the Whole Child

Presented By: Donna Tye-Lewis, MEd, Oklahoma Children's Hospital

Donna has worked in education for 20 years. She taught special education in Oklahoma public schools for the first 13 years of her career and has spent the last 8 years working as the School Program Coordinator at Oklahoma Children’s Hospital. She provides educational support to all patients in the hospital and assists when patients transition back to school. She is part of the Child Life and Therapeutic Programs team but coordinates with many of the specialty medicine teams within the hospital to support patients’ educational needs.

Session Description:
Collaborative care is an approach that is committed to helping each professional work to their highest scope of practice/top of their license. This model is about creating an environment where each moment spent with patients matters. Interdisciplinary collaboration enhances person-centered care to improve outcomes. This session will review best practices of collaborative care and take an in-depth look into implementation among psychosocial providers in the treatment of pediatric hematology and oncology.

Day 3 – Friday, May 3, 2024

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7:30am – 9:00am

Conference Lobby

Nutrition Bar opens

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8:00am-9:15am

Renaissance Place

HEAL Business Meeting

Presented By: Kelly Ihejiawu, HEAL President, Children's Medical Center, Dallas, TX

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9:15am-9:30am

Break

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9:30am-10:30aM

Breakout Sessions

Alexander Ballroom

Lecture

Bridging the Gap: Using Research to Better Support the Reintegration of Mental Health Patients Back into School

Presented By: Talia Fayson-Anthony and Ashley Hurse, Children's Health

Session Description:
In this presentation we will discuss the importance of embedding school support in all areas of psychiatry. We will examine the data from current research and present relevant information. This information guided our team to develop a more individualized school transition plans for our mental health population.

Renaissance Place

Roundtable

All About the Riley Hospital for Children School Program

Presented By: Kellee Clevenger, Lindsay DeWilde, Heather Homan, Kristin Lile, Madison Stewart, Stacy Willett, Riley Children's Hospital

Kellee Clevenger, B.Ed is an Educational Liaison at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, IN. Kellee specializes working with patients in the Outpatient Dialysis Unit and all Nephrology patients. Kellee works closely with her patient’s school to ensure they have the support they need while they are receiving dialysis 3 days per week. Kellee has been a hospital educator at Riley Hospital for Children for 8 years.

Lindsay DeWilde, BS is an Educational Liaison at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, IN. Lindsay specializes in Heart Transplant, Burn/Plastic Surgery, Cardiology, and Rehab patients. Lindsay follows her heart transplant patients for their entire school career post-transplant to ensure they receive the accommodations needed. Lindsay has been a hospital educator at Riley Hospital for Children for 12 years.

Heather Homan, BS is an Educational Liaison at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, IN. Heather specializes working with patients followed by Leukemia, Lymphoma, and Solid Tumor clinicians. Heather assists with school planning, provides ongoing educational support in the inpatient and outpatient setting, and follows her patients throughout their treatments. Heather has been a hospital educator at Riley Hospital for Children for 14 years.

Kristin Lile, BS is an Educational Liaison at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, IN. Kristin specializes in working with patients followed by Neuro-Oncology, Neurosurgery, Hematology, and Inpatient Rehabilitation. Kristin helps with setting up appropriate school plans, providing ongoing school support in the inpatient and outpatient setting, and following her parents throughout their treatments. Kristin has been a hospital educator at Riley Hospital for Children for 8 years.

Madison Stewart, M.S.Ed. recently stepped into the role as the School Program Manager at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, Indiana. Prior to her current role, Madison served as an Education Liaison at Riley Hospital working with patients followed by Solid Tumor Oncology and Hematology. She also supported students receiving treatment at the Simon Skjodt Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health Unit and the Charis Center for Eating Disorders. Madison shares it is her greatest joy to support patients and families navigating difficult medical journeys and to work alongside some of the best educators in Indiana. Madison has been a hospital educator at Riley Hospital for Children since 2021 and was a Special Education Teacher in Indianapolis Public Schools from 2019-2021.

Stacy Willett, BS is an Educational Liaison at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, IN. Stacy specializes in Leukemia, Lymphoma, and Inpatient Cystic Fibrosis patients. Stacy follows her leukemia and lymphoma patients during their treatment journey and provides school support post-treatment to ensure they receive the accommodations needed to continue to be successful in school. Stacy has been a hospital educator at Riley Hospital for Children for 21 years.

Session Description:

Welcome to Indianapolis, Indiana! As a pediatric hospital-based school program, the Riley School Program is excited to share about the educational services we provide as a program and provide a glimpse into our important work. Join us for this interactive session to learn about the parts of our program we are proud of, the lessons we have learned along the way, and the projects we are currently working on. This session will feature the amazing schoolteachers with hospital school program experience. Be sure to check out the session to learn about the Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital School Program, also located in Indianapolis!

Fletcher Place

Roundtable

Creation and Implementation of an Academic Discharge Summary

Presented By: Kris Frost, MEd and Pete Stavinoha, PhD, MD Anderson Children's Cancer Hospital

Kris currently serves as a school re-entry coordinator where she assists with all school related matters when pediatric patients are undergoing cancer treatment. She provides training to schools and staff to ensure that they have the tools they need when her patients return to school. With over 15 years as a school coordinator she also mentors new staff, assists with training, and provides resources to patients and families.

Session Description:
Evolving treatment paradigms have led to increased survival rates for children diagnosed with Cancer and other chronic illnesses. Increased survival rates can include unfavorable outcomes such as academic failure, neurocognitive difficulties, school absences, and prolonged homebound schooling. When it is time to return to school, many receiving schools feel unprepared to receive a child who has been treated for chronic illnesses. Many are unaware of the educational pain points of survivors. The Academic Discharge Summary will provide the receiving schools with the answers and strategies they are seeking, and provide them with knowledge to begin the educational process immediately.
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10:30am-10:45am

Break

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10:45am-12:15pm

Alexander Ballroom

Closing Session

Peace Rounds: Enhancing Educational Success Through Whole-person, Palliative Care Rounding

Presented By: Peter Baenziger, MS, MD, Courtney Lyon, BS, CCLS, and Heather Wiselogle, MEd, Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital and Alisha McGuire, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN

Peter Baenziger, MS, MD is a Pediatric Palliative care physician at Ascension St. Vincent’s Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital. Trained as a pediatrician and board certified in Hospice and Palliative Medicine, he provides symptom relief to children with a wide variety of medical problems, from neonatal conditions and cancer to trauma and chronic life-altering conditions. Peter finds it a privilege to offer expert guidance to patients and families facing complex, value-based healthcare decisions. He deeply cares that children receive compassionate medical care that maximizes joy and minimizes suffering. He has particular interests in clinical ethics, spirituality, humanism in medicine, and caring for the whole person and whole family through a multidisciplinary approach. When he isn’t in the hospital you find Peter chasing down and tickling his 4 children, discussing the intersection of medicine and faith with his also-a-doctor wife, and staring pensively at boiling maple sap as it magically turns to syrup.

Courtney Lyon spent 7 years at Riley Hospital for Children working on the Heart Center and Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit before transitioning into her new role at Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital where she currently serves patient and families in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Burn Intensive Care Unit, Outpatient Burn Clinic, Acute Care Inpatient Unit, and consults throughout the adult side of the hospital for over the past 8 months as a Certified Child Life Specialist. While at Riley and currently at Peyton Manning, Courtney participates in weekly Peace Rounds with members of the multidisciplinary team to work towards creating a safe, healing space for each patient touched. Courtney sits on the Bereavement Committee, Integrative Health Committee, and is the Co-Chair for the Great Lakes Association of Child Life Professionals Education Committee leading students and professionals through professional webinars and conferences. Courtney takes pride in providing family centered care when approaching each patient, and values family and patients needs first. Courtney is a strong advocate for self-care, mental health advocacy, and building a strong foundation of trust with each patient and family. The collaboration between the School Program, Palliative Care, Healing Arts, Child Life, and Pet Therapy is invaluable and is something Courtney takes pride in every day at Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital. 

Alisha McGuire (she/her) is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with the Pediatric Palliative Care Team at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis. For the past seven years, Alisha has developed a deep passion for working with patients and families adjusting to illness/diagnosis, anticipatory grief, and bereavement as a medical social worker.  Alisha serves as Co-Chair with the Social Work Hospice & Palliative Care Network (SWHPN) Pediatrics Special Interest Group and SWHPN representative for the National Coalition for Hospice and Palliative Care Pediatric Division. She volunteers on the planning committee for Camp Healing Tree, an annual children’s grief camp through Brooke’s Place for Grieving Young People. Alisha received her Master’s in Social Work from Rutgers University as a part of their Advanced Standing Program. She is a Certified Advanced Palliative and Hospice Social Worker (APHSW-C) with an additional Certification in Palliative Care and End-of-Life through the Smith School of Social Work. She is currently a Fellow with NYU’s Zelda Foster Leadership Fellowship in Palliative Care and End of Life.

Heather Wiselogle spent 15 years in a traditional elementary school prior to transitioning to the classroom at Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at Ascension St. Vincent in Indianapolis. Since 2018 she has supported over 130 oncology patients and families with school needs in and out of the hospital before, during, and after treatment. She also serves as hospital teacher/liaison to other inpatient units and outpatient clinics including, but not limited to, PICU, pediatric acute care units, burn unit/clinic, TNICU and adult units with adolescent and/or young adult patients, Women’s Hospital/NICU, and speciality outpatient clinics. The hospital classroom is utilized for school sessions for inpatients (with flexibility to do bedside sessions) to provide patients with a “school away from school” opportunity to keep their academic goals on track in light of an extended hospital stay. Heather also provides liaison and advocacy work to connect school/home/hospital to support patients’ learning needs, re-entry to school, IEP/504 planning and accommodation recommendations. At Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital, we pride ourselves in the interdisciplinary team approach, specifically on our Pediatric Support Services Team which encompasses Child Life, Healing Arts, Pet Therapy and School Program. These teams are also highly integrated with our Palliative Care team as we strive to heal the mind, body, and spirit. Outside of the hospital you can find Heather cheering on her favorite teams at a sporting event, reading for fun, hanging on the lake, or on an outdoor adventure with her 4 year old daughter, husband, and 2 sweet and sassy pups.

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12:15pm-12:30pm

Alexander Ballroom

Closing Remarks

Presented By: Kelly Ihejiawu, HEAL President, Children's Medical Center, Dallas, TX

Register Now!